Safe Harbor Agreement Definition Apes

Landowners are not required to maintain improved habitat conditions above the starting value once the SHA contract expires. At the end of the SHA, landowners who have increased species populations on their land to their base level can undo the number of species and habitat before entering an SHA in their state. The SHA may be extended as long as the landowner and the USFWS mutually agree; However, if the landowner does not renew the agreement, the landowner will no longer be protected from ESA sanctions or possible restrictions on land use. Figure 1 shows an example of ADS using hectares of important habitat to determine the fundamental responsibility of the landowner. Until now, the SHA used in Florida has been used to protect habitat from endangered red-woodpecking (Picoides borealis). Currently, Florida has 16 SHAs (about 95,000 hectares). Participants in these agreements are generally larger landowners who already use land management practices that benefit the green woodpecker as part of their wildlife management. The actions taken by these landowners will likely contribute to the recovery of RCW species in Florida. The use of ASH in North Carolina has already helped reverse the decline in cars and cultivate a positive attitude of landowners towards ESA regulations (Kishida 2001).

In exchange for measures contributing to the recovery of species listed on non-federal lands, participating landowners receive formal assurances from the service that, if they meet the sha conditions, the service does not require additional management or other activities from the participants without their consent. In addition, at the end of the agreement period, participants can reuse the registered property on the basic conditions that existed at the beginning of the SHA. A Safe Harbor Agreement (SHA) is a voluntary agreement involving private or non-federal owners of property whose actions contribute to the restoration of species considered threatened or threatened under the Classified Species Act (ESA). The agreement exists between the cooperating non-federal property owners and the United States. . . .