Good Friday Agreement Summary

The Belfast Agreement is also known as the Good Friday Agreement, as it was concluded on Good Friday on 10 April 1998. It was an agreement between the British and Irish governments and most of northern Ireland`s political parties on how to govern Northern Ireland. Discussions that led to the agreement have focused on issues that have led to conflict in recent decades. The aim was to form a new de-defyed government for Northern Ireland, where unionists and nationalists would share power. Brooke also tried to connect northern Ireland`s constitutional parties. He proposed that cross-party discussions should be tackled in three areas: the first to deal with relations within Northern Ireland; the second, which deals with relations between the two parts of Ireland; and the third on the links between the British government and the Irish government. Discussions began in April 1991, but quickly became part of procedural disputes. But the three-part format should be at the center of the Good Friday agreement. The agreement consists of two related documents, both agreed on Good Friday, 10 April 1998 in Belfast: an agreement that cannot even agree on its own name – irony. The overall result of these problems was to undermine trade unionists` confidence in the agreement exploited by the anti-DUP agreement, which eventually overtook the pro-agreement Ulster Unionist Party (UUP) in the 2003 general elections. UUP had already resigned from the executive in 2002 following the Stormontgate scandal, in which three men were indicted for intelligence gathering. These charges were eventually dropped in 2005 because persecution was not „in the public interest.“ Immediately afterwards, one of Sinn Féin`s members, Denis Donaldson, was unmasked as a British agent.

One young man said of the agreement: „Erm, I`ve never heard of it. I don`t know. I don`t know what it is. The agreement called for the creation of an independent commission to review police rules in Northern Ireland, „including ways to promote broad community support“ for these agreements. The UK government has also pledged to carry out a „large-scale review“ of the criminal justice system in Northern Ireland. The two main political parties in the agreement were the Ulster Unionist Party (UUP), led by David Trimble, and the Social Democratic and Labour Party (SDLP), led by John Hume. The two heads of state and government together won the Nobel Peace Prize in 1998. The other parties to the agreement were Sinn Féin, the Alliance Party and the Progressive Unionist Party. The Democratic Unionist Party (DUP), which later became the largest Unionist party, did not support the agreement.

When Sinn Féin and loyalist parties entered, they left the talks because republican and loyalist paramilitary weapons had not been decommissioned. In addition to the number of signatories [Note 1], Stefan Wolff identifies the following similarities and differences between the issues raised in the two agreements:[28] The IRA renewed its ceasefire on 20 July 1997 and paved the way for Sinn Féin to be associated with the cross-party discussions that began under Mitchell`s presidency.